Take Your Running to the Next Level with RunKNOX

RunKNOX Training Group

We hear it all the time: “I don’t need to pay someone to tell me how to run. It’s easy and I can do it for free.” Yes, running can be an individual activity. I enjoy solo running as much as the next person, but when it comes to setting big, bold goals, joining a training program provides significant advantages.

Why do runners need a coach?

  • Our coaches are runners just like you. We’ve been there and love to share what we’ve learned through personal experience. We’ll literally be there every step of the way. Want some help hitting your paces? We’ll run with you!
  • Our coaches are certified and educated. We understand the physiology of exercise and we design workouts to specifically elicit changes at the cellular level. Nothing is arbitrary as every run has a specific purpose. We follow a systematic approach to incrementally change you from the inside out. We know when to push you harder and often more importantly, when to reign you back in.
  • With a coach, comes a team. We work with a wide variety of clients from walkers to Boston Marathon Qualifiers. Whatever your background, you’ll have an entire support network to help optimize your training. Joining RunKNOX might be the step that takes your training to a new level.
Early morning track workouts

What is RunKNOX?

  • The Knoxville Track Club’s coach led training program. We work to reach individual goals in a group setting. Upon joining, you’ll be asked to fill out a questionnaire so the coaches understand your background, experience, injury history, and future goals. You’ll get personalized training pace recommendations based off of a time trial, or recent race performance. We meet as a big group and split up into small groups of individuals of similar ability. You’ll run at your personal pace, but within the group setting. Team camaraderie and group accountability are powerful tools that we utilize regularly.

What do you train for?

  • Most participants are targeting KTC’s big seasonal events such as Pigeon Forge 13.1/5k (Fall), Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon 26.2/13.1/Relay/5k (Winter), Expo 10k/5k (Spring), and Fireball 5k/Carter Mill 10k/Pigeon Forge 8k (Summer).
  • We’re happy to program for any race that you wish to run. For example, we recently had folks participating in the CrossKnox 15k, Air Force and Chicago Marathons, multiple trail races, and Baltimore 13.1. Indianapolis, Chickamauga, Secret City, Philadelphia, Cali International, and Kiawah are coming up next.
  • Some participants don’t race. They are simply involved for the accountability and social support.
RunKNOX Yoga at Physio Lab

What does a RunKNOX membership cost?

  • Just $10/week. It’s a steal. One random drop-in yoga class in Knoxville will cost you at least 10 bucks. KTC is a nonprofit and RunKNOX is here as a service to the community, so we work hard to keep costs down. We have multiple discounts available and a scholarship program as well. If you need some help, just ask!

What does membership entail?

  • Weekly detailed Training Program via email plus regular access to 3 coaches
  • Monday Evening Core Workout 6:15 pm at The Long Run
  • Tuesday Evening Quality Run (intervals/tempo/hills) 6 pm at Tennessee Sports Medicine Group
  • Wednesday Morning Quality Run (same as Tues night) 5am at West High School
  • Wednesday Evening Quality Run (same as Tues night and Wed morning) 5:30 pm at Melton Lake Park in Oak Ridge
  • Thursday Evening Yoga 6:15 pm at PhysioLab
  • Saturday Morning Long Runs (time and location vary by season)
RunKNOX Core Workout at The Long Run

My question back to those of you who don’t train with a coach and/or in a group: Why aren’t you plugged into a program? For the cost of going out to eat once per week, you can get a full week’s worth of coach led training within a fun, supportive team. If you have questions, give me a shout and I’ll be happy to chat!  

Coach Scott Schmidt, RunKNOX

Community Contributor: Scott Schmidt, Head Coach & Program Director of the Knoxville Track Club’s RunKNOX training program  http://www.ktc.org/RunKNOX.html

Website: http://www.ktc.org/RunKNOX.html or search “RunKNOX’ on https://runsignup.com/

Email: runknox@gmail.com   

Social Media: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.

Scott Schmidt is the Head Coach and Program Director of RunKNOX. He is a graduate of the University of Tennessee, receiving his bachelor’s degree in Education (Exercise Science concentration) in 2003 and master’s degree in Exercise Physiology in 2006. He works for the Department of Energy as an Exercise Physiologist, focusing on employee physical fitness testing, training, and wellness promotion. Scott is an ACSM Certified Exercise Physiologist and RRCA Certified Running Coach. Scott ran the 2007 Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon to check “marathon” off his bucket list. That “one and done” marathon has turned into 20+ as he’s now working toward checking a marathon in all 50 states off of his list. He and his wife, Angie, are extremely active in the Knoxville Track Club and received the 2013 Ginny Canfield Memorial Service Award in appreciation of their volunteer efforts. Scott volunteers time by serving on the Board of Directors, Road Race Committee, and as a Race Director.

Patience in the Process

Patrick Thomas Gildea, Director/Head Coach for the Knoxville Distance Project

One of the more beloved anthems in the Grateful Dead arsenal is “Shakedown Street” and it can be a metaphor for increasing mileage and building endurance from the beginner to the advanced runner. Bear with me here… In a similar fashion to way the original jam kings took their time, improvising and delicately maneuvering their way through each song until the final note was played, you can find a like-minded approach to your own running. A verse in the song states, “Maybe you had too much too fast,” and if you take that into consideration and place in the context of your own running when making a jump training it makes total sense. You can’t simply add more miles all at once. You’re headed down a slippery slope or facing uphill battle – whichever way you look at it. If you read in between the notes of the song, really, it speaks about patience.

I think, as runners, the most important lesson we can take away from training is always practicing patience. Success doesn’t occur overnight. Sure, we’d all love to feel great each day, have our best workout or set a PR in every race we run. It’s not practical though. Taking a long-term approach to training, making adjustments with your coach, if you have one, along the way can prove to be very valuable if you want to reach and exceed your goals. Understanding where you are and where you want to go is important.

“Sure don’t know what I’m going for, but I’m gonna go for it for sure.”

Whether you’re starting out on Barren Ground or you have more than a few races under your belt, there’s no good advice in being Runaway Jim and Throwing Stones to the wind when increasing your training load. If you train appropriately and manage each day accordingly, you too, can Run Like An Antelope. Taking a cautious approach and being mindful that your body can handle an amount which is appropriate for where you are is a safe approach. Some things to consider when increasing mileage and building your endurance:

  • Recovery – Make sure that you are adequately rested before you head out on your next run. In order to run more and build that base, it is imperative that you stay healthy, minimize injury and recovery is the major component. Foam roll, stretch, strength and conditioning – all keys to recovery and injury management.
  • Consistency – A simple way to increase mileage and build endurance is to get out and run. Add to the frequency at which you run while making sure that you’re taking each run easy and not pressing. Your body responds to stress. It’ll learn to manage it. A soft, easy, short run has benefit. Get out and go!
  • Pace/Effort – Take your time. There’s no point in rushing your way to success. Working your way through training “on feel” can be a good way to progress from one step to another. Simple checks along the way; using a sliding scale of effort can be beneficial.
  • Focus – On the details. Feel things like rhythm, cadence, breathing, form. Get to know them well. Having a joyful approach to your training as opposed to having to hit a desired amount of mileage. Mileage is just a number. Time well spent can be seen as much more valuable.
  • Mileage/Minutes – Whether you go by one or the other, take it slowly. It’s not practical to go from a 5 mile run to a 15 mile run. When increasing, be mindful on the physicality of the run. For someone just starting out, allow your body to adapt for about a month before making an increase in mileage.

We all wish we had the exact answer, that Estimated Prophet appearing and telling us everything will be okay. The reality is that when you’re putting together a training program you want a philosophy Built to Last. There’s more than one bridge that leads Across the River. Take your time, there’s Pastures of Plenty and if you set out in believing that – you will find success.

Patrick is a Tennessee graduate where he was a standout distance runner for the Vols. He competed professionally and qualified for two IAAF World Championships in cross country and half-marathon. He’s run PR’s of 14:01 for 5k, 28:38 for 10k and 63:43 for the half-marathon. He’s coached runners of all ages and ability. Patrick is the Director/Head Coach at Knoxville Distance Project where he values training with balance, structure and flexibility. You can contact him at knoxdistanceproject@gmail.com.

Why do YOU run??

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I wanted to try something new with the posts…

I want to know WHY people run.

For me, I started running because I was out of shape from having a baby and had zero friends when I moved here. I wanted to be healthy and surround myself with great people who happen to run. Now I’m healthy and am friends with great people!

…so why do YOU run?

When the weather is crappy or sunny, what keeps you running?

Why do you keep showing up at the Group runs, gyms, or for long or short runs?

What got you started with running?

What keeps you coming back?

I would love to repost YOUR story with a picture to represent the runners of Knoxville!

Tag us to be featured #865running or email us at 865running@gmail.com!

Photo Credit: Running the Alley

Knoxville Running

You know what I love about the Knoxville running scene?

It doesn’t matter if you’re fast, slow, big, small, tall, short, young, or old…

The folks you meet at the Knoxville Group Runs will welcome you and quite possibly become your new best friends!

Running is supposed to be fun, so why not run with a group?

Group runs are 7 days a week rain or shine, hot or cold.

Find one near you by checking the Knoxville Group Run Schedule

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